Festive Season Attack!


Calorie counter

So just how much calories are you piling on from a day of snacking? Here is a guide to some of your favourite New Year treats.

Food (per serving) Calories (kcal)* Jogging Duration (minutes)
Bak Kwa, Pork (1 slice, 94g) 370 47
Love Letters (3 rolls, 39g) 168 21
Peanut Crackers (1 small plate, 88g) 418 53
Pineappple Tarts (3 pieces, 20g) 246 31
Twisted Cookies (3 pieces, 12g) 201 26

http://www.hpb.gov.sg/foodforhealth/article.aspx?id=6888

 

Pineapple tarts

A familiar sight at every house, these bite-size treats are small buttery pastries generously topped with pineapple jam.

2 pieces of pineapple tarts (40g) contain 165 calories

Bak Kwa (barbequed pork)

Another traditional favourite, these sweet pieces of barbequed pork are a hot-seller every Chinese New Year.

1 piece of Bak Kwa (57g) contains 230 calories.

Love letters

Made primarily from eggs, sugar and flour, these sweet treats can be found in every household during Chinese New Year

3 pieces of love letters (40g) contains 170 calories.

Kueh Lapis

The yummy kueh lapis is a common snack during the festive season and involves painstakingly baking each layer of cake before completion.

1 slice of kueh lapis (50g) contains 240 calories.

Shrimp rolls

These little fried rolls are filled with savoury fillings made from dried prawns and chilli.

10 pieces of shrimp rolls (45g) contain 230 calories.

Kueh bangkit

This sweet tapioca rice flour cookie melts in your mouth not in your hands.

5 pieces of kueh bangkit (20g) contain 75 calories.

Kueh bulu

This sweet mini sponge cake is a favourite among children for its fluffy texture.

3 pieces of kueh bulu (30g) contain 100 calories.

Peanut puff

Deep fried pastries in the shape of curry puffs, these peanut puffs contain ground peanuts and sugar.

3 pieces (20g) contains 120 calories.

Calorie count provided by Aptima Nutrition & Sports Consultants and the Health Promotion Board (HPB).

“The easiest and most effective way to maintain your current weight is to control your food intake and what you eat,” advises Ron. “Take control of what you put on your plate and make smart choices. Look out for healthier alternatives and choose those instead of the usual snacks,” he says.

Tips on healthier eating

If you have plans for week-long visiting sessions with friends and relatives, keep these handy tips from nutritionists in mind:

Snacks

– Before heading out, have a small snack e.g. a small sandwich or a bun to fill your stomach. This will fill you up a little and combat the urge to snack.

– Every house you visit will have lots of snacks to offer and you might end up being asked to try all the different snacks by your host, so try to limit your intake to one piece of each goodie and take smaller portions of each.

– Be wary of hidden sugar found in snacks like sour plums or preserved foods

– Do not sit close to where the goodies are placed as you will be more inclined to reach out and have a piece or two.

– If you have a sudden craving for something sweet, try eating a few slices of mandarin oranges before having a piece of your favourite goodie.

During a meal

– During meal time, try to pick the lean meats among the spread of dishes and trim off excess fat as well as remove the skin before eating. Also, try not to take meat that is drenched in gravy.

– If you feel it is rude to refuse food offered to you, especially from an older person, just take some of it but stop at one piece.

– At the dinner table, eat slowly and always have some food on your plate so your host will not top it up for you.

– Focus on quality, not quantity. You are not expected to have a serving of each dish so choose 3-5 dishes that you find the most appealing and take smaller portions of each. Enjoy your favourites and skip the rest.

– Decide at the beginning how much you want to eat, fill your plate once and do not go back for second helpings.

– Have an extra serving of vegetables, especially if it’s steamed or in soup. Fiber present in the vegetable will help you feel full with fewer calories. An extra serving of vegetables is always a good option if you’re not full.

Desserts

– Limit your dessert intake and share the treat with a friend or relative

– Get nutrient-rich, not calorie-rich options and try to have a serving of fruit if they are available

Drink up

– Whenever possible, choose plain water, coffee or tea without sugar instead of sweetened or carbonated drinks. Drinking a packet of sweetened chrysanthemum drink is equivalent to eating one roti prata.

http://www.insing.com/news/food-and-drink/calorie-attack-cny-snacks/id-4d1a0b00/7?nav=20000

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